Call for Papers | Exercise and environment: new geographies of the exercise experience and what we can learn from them

Call for Papers: Royal Geographical Society with IBG Annual Conference, London, 27-29 August 2014. Session “Exercise and environment: new geographies of the exercise experience and what we can learn from them”.

Session organizers: Alan Latham, Russell Hitchings and Andrew Barnfield, UCL Geography. Sponsored by the Geography of Health Research Group (GHRG)


 

Lowther Lodge, Royal Geographical Society (with Institute of British Geographers) headquarters, designed by Richard Norman Shaw
Lowther Lodge, Kensington Gore, London, Royal Geographical Society (with Institute of British Geographers) headquarters, designed by Richard Norman Shaw. Photo: Steve Cadman.

Physical fitness practices are part of the background of contemporary life. Jogging, cycling, walking, swimming, weight training, roller blading, dancing, playing and training for all kinds of sports animate people’s everyday worlds in all sorts of significant and often surprising ways. These practices can be approached as palliatives to the sedentarism of much of modern life, as ways of caring for body and self, as forms of self or group expression, as the foci of different socialities, and as sites of bodily and environmental innovation. Yet despite this diversity, the lived experience of undertaking these various practices has yet to receive the social scientific attention it deserves. This is surprising when an appreciation of how and why people come to exercise in some ways and places instead of others stands to generate new insights for policy agendas that span those associated with public health promotion and the fight against obesity, to the encouragement of community cohesion and wider social wellbeing.

This call for papers begins with the assumption that it is worth considering the material composition of exercise ecologies in terms of how different exercise environments are physically experienced and how identified exercise practices become attached to them. In particular, we are interested in research centred on the changing ways in which exercise is done and how the contextual attunement that may be said to characterise a geographical approach to this topic may enliven our understanding of this. We do so because such approaches promise to provide a fresh perspective on the above agendas and to breathe new life into wider debates concerning how and where exercise is done today, and how and where it may be done tomorrow.

The purpose of these sessions is therefore to bring together an eclectic range of papers to develop this line of research. As such, topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • The emergence of new fitness practices
  • The disappearance of others
  • How routines of physical fitness are sustained and unsettled
  • The experienced implications of different exercise environments
  • Different technologies of fitness and what they do to us
  • The sociality of physical fitness
  • Care of the self during physical fitness
  • Combining exercise with other activities in everyday life
  • Coping with weather, dirt and the elements
  • How surfaces, sweat and sports kit shape the exercise experience
  • Competition and co-operation during everyday sport
  • The sensorial expression of active corporeality
  • The influence of different landscapes on exercise and fitness routines
  • How and why urban exercise practices may differ from elsewhere
  • New methods to examine and evaluate the exercise experience

Please send a proposed abstract of 200-300 words to either of the following by 10 February 2014:

More detail about the conference: http://www.rgs.org/WhatsOn/ConferencesAndSeminars/Annual+International+Conference/Annual+international+conference.htm

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