A Cultural History of the World Cup – Conference Centre, British Library, Fri 23 May 2014, 09.00-17.00

Uruguay 1930. Two different balls were used in the final: Argentina supplied the first-half ball and led 2-1 at the break; Uruguay supplied the second-half ball and won 4-2.
Uruguay 1930. Two different balls were used in the final: Argentina supplied the first-half ball and led 2-1 at the break; Uruguay supplied the second-half ball and won 4-2.

An international conference for academics and postgraduate students interested in the material culture, history and globalisation of the football World Cup, hosted by the British Library and the International Centre for Sport History and Culture De Montfort University. Keynote speakers include David Goldblatt and Matthew Brown. Confirmed speakers also include Matthew TaylorRichard Holt, John Hughson, Martin Polley, Stacey PopeKevin Marston and Kevin Moore (Director of the National Football Museum, Manchester).

The focus of the world’s gaze on Brazil as a sporting innovator is not new. The first Brazil World Cup in 1950 showcased the global reach of modern football as a media spectacle more extensively than at any previous point in history, also in a context of economic growth, cultural modernity and political challenges. Contemporary Brazil has attracted global attention through the forthcoming World Cup and the ensuing 2016 Rio Olympic Games. It is therefore timely to consider how the history, and legacy of the game have influenced world culture.

9.30 – 10.00 coffee and registration
10.00 event starts
17.00 event ends

The conference will be followed by a drinks reception

Prices (including buffet lunch and refreshments): £30.00 (full price); £15.00 (concessions: senior citizens, job-seekers, students, third-sector employees, practitioners).

Event Partners: The British Library & The International Centre for Sport History and Culture, De Montfort University

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