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    Important sport critique fails to engage wider audiences

    In his latest book, Making Sport Great Again: The Uber-Sport Assemblage, Neoliberalism, and the Trump Conjuncture (Palgrave), sociologist and leading left-leaning sport critic David L. Andrews, Professor of Physical Cultural Studies, University of Maryland, delivers a fiercely critical analysis of the state of sport under neoliberalism. However, as our reviewer Paul Dimeo notes, Andrews’ ideas of democracy and inclusion are cloaked in nigh on impenetrable sociological vernacular.

    Leisure Sciences, Volume 41, 2019, Issue 1–2: Feminist Knowledges as Interventions in Physical Cultures

    Leisure Sciences presents scientific inquiries into the study of leisure, recreation, parks, travel, and tourism from a social science perspective. Articles cover the social and psychological aspects of leisure, planning for leisure environments, leisure gerontology, travel and tourism behavior, leisure economics, and urban leisure delivery systems.

    Journal of Sport & Social Issues, Vol. 42, 2018, No. 6

    Journal of Sport and Social Issues (JSSI) brings you the latest research, discussion and analysis on contemporary sport issues. Using an international, interdisciplinary perspective, JSSI examines today's most pressing and far-reaching questions about sport.

    “Sport for Social Inclusion” | Special issue of Social Inclusion

    New special issue, Vol 5, No 2 (2017), of Social Inclusion, "Sport for Social Inclusion”, is now out. All articles are free to download (open access). Please feel free to share the articles with your colleagues. Editor: Reinhard Haudenhuyse (Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium)

    Two text books on the sociology of sport that probably work best together

    In this original review for idrottsforum.org, Jay Coakley takes on two introductory textbooks in the sociology of sport, Sport Sociology by Peter Craig and Sport and Society, edited by Barrie Houlihan & Dominic Malcolm (both Sage Publications). His critical analysis from the point of view of the academic teacher leads him to a well-argued conclusions that will be rewarding reading for teachers as well as for the respective author/editors.

    Insightful, in-depth overview of the effects of neoliberalism on the governance and management of sports

    The edited volume Sport and Neoliberalism: Politics, Consumption, and Culture (Temple University Press), compiled by David L. Andrews and Michail L. Silk, takes a critical stance on neoliberalism as a dominant organizing mechanism, in society and in sports. Our reviewer Russell Holden has but few reservations to this vital and useful analysis of modern sports.

    An ambitious introduction to the wide-ranging field of sport management

    For her edited volume Contemporary Issues in Sport Management: A Critical Introduction (Sage Publications), Terri Byers have engaged a large number of contributing scholars of sport management, probing central issues in the field. Søren Bennie is our reviewer, and while pointing to a few weak points, his balanced assessment is that it’s a valuable and useful contribution to this research field.

    Comprehensive collection, with the usual suspects and some bright spots

    In his knowledgeable review of A Companion to Sport, edited by David L. Andrews and Ben Carrington, Alan Bairner, Professor of Sport and Social Theory at Loughborough University, finds that the volume offers something for everybody, if not everything for all.

    Nordamerikanska erfarenheter av och insikter om staden och sporten

    Mats Franzén Sporting dystopias. The making and meanings of urban sport cultures (Albany: State University of New York Press 2003) som redigerats av Ralph C. Wilcox, David L. Andrews, Robert Pitter och Richard L. Irwin, tillhandahåller inga solskenshistorier om staden och sporten – men titeln till trots inte heller några egentliga sportdystopier. Snarare finns här en rad realistiska korrektiv till den...
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