"David Rowe" tag

Sport in Society, Volume 20, 2017, Issue 10

The considerable growth of interest in commerce, media and politics and their relationship to sport in international academia has resulted in academics in various disciplines writing about sport. Sport in Society is a multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary forum for academics to discuss the growing relationship of sport to significant areas of modern life.

Slim volume that puts olympic media in new light

Eurosport, owned by Discovery, will be exclusive multiplatform broadcast supplier in Europe of 2018–2024 Olympic Games. Given that, suggests Erik Meier, The Global Impact of Olympic Media at London 2012 by Andrew C. Billings & Marie C. Hardin (eds.) from Routledge is welcome, and important, reading.

Uppfriskande och nytänkande om idrott och medier i ett globalt perspektiv

Marit Stub Nybelius recenserar forumbloggaren David Rowes Global Media Sport: Flows, Forms and Futures, som kom i pocketutgåva för ett och ett halvt år sedan. Rowe bryter nya vägar, menar vår recensent, han presenterar nya insikter, han diskuterar och problematiserar.

“The quest for interdisciplinarity will have to wait for another day”

The pursuit of interdisciplinarity in sport studies in the hope of breaking the natural and biosciences hegemony in the field is the objective of editor Joseph Maguire’s collected volume Social Sciences in Sport. Alan Bairner reviews the effort and finds much to appreciate, but apparently, this is not the holy grail that the social sciences of sport urgently need.

The future for public service media, sport and cultural citizenship are far from lost

Britt-Marie Ringfjord has read what she deems an important contribution to contemporary sports media studies, Sport, Public Broadcasting and Cultural Citizenship: Signal Lost?, edited by Jay Scherer and David Rowe.

Comprehensive collection, with the usual suspects and some bright spots

In his knowledgeable review of A Companion to Sport, edited by David L. Andrews and Ben Carrington, Alan Bairner, Professor of Sport and Social Theory at Loughborough University, finds that the volume offers something for everybody, if not everything for all.